Board Retreats: Don’t Skip the Fun

Today we’re going to talk about fun.

Running a successful nonprofit organization is a lot of hard work. There are animals to save, people to feed, art to be created – the list goes on and on. On top of all of the world bettering, comes the day to day operations. Your organization not only has internal leadership, but a board of directors. This group is entrusted to not only making sure the organization does things right, but does the right thing. Again, a lot of hard work by a lot of people just trying to make the world a little better.

Back to the fun. With all these responsibilities it’s important that you don’t skip the fun at your next board retreat. We’re not talking about putting “fun” as an agenda item between strategic planning and lunch. More like weaving fun into the entire retreat.

Don’t skip the fun at your next

board retreat!

Here are six ways to put the fun in your next board retreat:

1. Don’t conduct regular board business at the retreat. I understand that this is difficult, but it is a real momentum killer. When there is that “one little item to cover while we’re all together” it is tempting to address it at the beginning or at the end, but that “one little thing” rabbit holes into a lot different directions. Avoid this. Find another way to address it like an e-mail vote or a conference call a few days before the retreat.

2. Be active. Skip the room with just room for a conference table; find a space that accommodates moving around. Do some work sitting, some standing, some outside in the fresh air. Mix up the agenda so it isn’t the same person talking most of the day. More active participation will lead to better results because everyone feels heard and included.

3. Mix up the groups. Every board has natural groups so you need to do some prep and put retreat teams together that are counter to the natural groupings. Then change the groups throughout the retreat. Encourage board members to interact with someone they don’t already know well. If you have new members attending, ensure that they are interacting with longer-serving members. Again, this allows everyone to feel heard and included.

4. Combine team building with retreat objectives. Team building exercises don’t have to be standalone items that appear to distract from the objectives of the board. For instance, if you want board members to work on their elevator speeches, have them do it in pairs. When I facilitate a retreat, I work with board and staff leadership to establish objectives THEN I look for ways to weave in fun exercises that relate to those objectives.

5. Laugh. The work your organization is doing is important and likely not a laughing matter. But, when a board laughs together they form bonds that will serve them in the future. Use an exercise that allows board members to laugh at themselves and each other.

6. Include your mission. Your nonprofit has a unique mission and personality so be sure to include that in your retreat. This also allows your board to really immerse in the mission and remember why they joined the board in the first place. For example, if you are an arts organization do something creative. Help the board make memories together so they can work better together to support the mission.

Don’t be afraid of having fun at your board retreat. Retreats provide an opportunity to move the work of your board forward and help your board build relationships to better serve the mission.

We’d enjoy the opportunity to discuss how we can help make your next board retreat fun and successful.

Leadership Inspiration: Some Favorite Memories

The Nonprofit Leadership Center hosts an annual Leadership Conference that brings thought leaders to our community each year. While serving on the NLC staff, I had the privilege of meeting many of the keynote speakers. Since leaving staff, I’ve enjoyed the conference as a participant. 

As NLC prepares to present their 10th annual conference, I found myself reminiscing about some of my favorites. Many of them I’d never heard of before the conference but now they are my go-to resources for leadership inspiration. 

I’ve compiled a list of my favorites and included links to some of their work: 

Jon Acuff / How to Be Kinder to Yourself in 1 Sentence

Andy Goodman / The Goodman Center (whose tagline is “where do-gooders do better”)

Shawn Achor / TEDx on Happiness

Travis Bradberry / The Secret to Team Performance and 5 Strategies to Achieve It Virtually

Sally Hogshead / The Little Recession Playbook

Simon T. Bailey / Spark Opportunity in the New Normal

Dan Pallotta / Social Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship

Maybe after the 10th Annual Conference on October 13, I’ll have a new favorite. I look forward to “seeing you” there and experiencing the new virtual format with you!